Safety Culture Change: The Cost of Getting it Wrong

Safety-Culture Change: The Cost of Getting it WrongSafety-culture change is a tricky thing.  Do it well and your organization will reap the benefits of a stronger safety culture and all that accompanies it–including higher levels of employee engagement and employee ownership.  Get it wrong and you could find your organization in a worse place than it was before you started the change.  Here, in no particular order, are just a few of the negative consequences of getting it wrong. 10 Things Leaders Absolutely Must Know to Plan for Sustainable Safety Culture Change

… This article is part of an e-book. To continue reading, please enter the password in the box below the author bio. Or click the ebook image to the right to purchase!

Eric Svendsen

Eric Svendsen, Ph.D., is Principal and lead change agent for safetyBUILT-IN, a safety-leadership learning and development organization. He has over 20 years experience in creating and executing outcomes-based leadership development and culture change initiatives aligned to organizational goals, and he personally led the safety-culture initiatives of a number of client organizations that resulted in “best ever safety performance” years for those companies.

 

Eric Svendsen

Eric Svendsen, Ph.D., is Principal and lead change agent for safetyBUILT-IN, a safety-leadership learning and development organization. He has over 20 years experience in creating and executing outcomes-based leadership development and culture change initiatives aligned to organizational goals, and he personally led the safety-culture initiatives of a number of client organizations that resulted in “best ever safety performance” years for those companies.

Comments

  1. Dear Colleagues,

    As a company or organization whether for profit or non-profit, management has to do the basics. These basics start with employee orientation into the vision and strategy, as well as on their new roles and responsibilities under the new conditions. Handbooks can always be provided to employees so that they can always read and remind themselves of these issues.
    This starts it right and most likely to have the best results out of such a worker as long as they are still employed and can through all the requirements and changes the organization introduces.

    Cheers.

  2. Sean A. Walker says:

    Hi Eric,

    I have come across much what you are saying in your article on safety culture change: the cost of getting it wrong. I used as a guide to our safety culture survey the HSE’s ‘Safety culture maturity model’ and the survey questions were based around the 10 elements of a safety culture maturity model. You talk about compromised employee trust, that for me includes management dis-trust also, the employee’s were all for the safety culture survey some of the site management team thought that the findings would be damning of them. I have since communicated the findings to all site stakeholders, but before I did that I conducted a session with the site management team they were scathing of the findings and purely dismissed them out of hand. When the initial dust settled they came up with a list actions that they would commit to and when I conducted the session with the workers to inform of the management commitment they were happy that there was an approach to resolve issues highlighted, nothing was done which led to what you call employee cynicism and disengagement which did for a while makes site issues very difficult, there was a clear lack of leadership on site management part. I found reading your piece like an extract from my diary. A good read Eric, thank you.

Leave a Reply to Sean A. Walker Cancel reply

*